Singapore

Singapore

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Singapore, officially the Republic of Singapore, is a sovereign island city-state in maritime Southeast Asia. The English name of “Singapore” is an anglicisation of the native Malay name for the country, Singapura, which was in turn derived from the Sanskrit word for “lion city”. There are four official languages of Singapore: English, Malay, Chinese and Tamil. English is the lingua franca. Whether you’re a nature lover, culture buff, thrill-seeker or cocktail enthusiast, Singapore has a wide selection of leisure offerings within easy reach.

Interesting Facts:

  • Singapore’s land area includes as many as 64 offshore islands that surround the main island. These include Sentosa (the largest of the offshore islands), PulauUbin, St John’s Island and Sisters’ Islands. What that means for visitors: more fun in the sun!
  • According to the Wildlife Reserves Singapore, the first man-made waterfall was built at Jurong Bird Park in 1971. Dropping from a height of 30 metres, it is said to be the tallest waterfall in an aviary to date
  • The locals speak Singlish, not just English. Don’t be too surprised to hear Singaporeans adding exclamations like ‘lah’ and ‘leh’ to their sentence. Singlish— theircolourful local slang— is an integral part of everyday conversation amongst Singaporeans.
  • The star event—the FORMULA 1 SINGAPORE GRAND PRIX—also made racing history as the world’s first ever FORMULA 1 night race.
  • Lauded as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2015, the Singapore Botanic Gardens has a history of over 150 years since its founding in 1859; that’s more than a century older than modern Singapore itself!
  • You may have heard about the Merlion, Singapore’s iconic emblem. The Merlion is a mythical creature with a lion’s head and a fish’s tail. The Merlion was partly inspired by the city’s Sanskrit name, Singapura, which means ‘lion city’. This Sanskrit name is thought to have been given by a Sumatran prince Sang NilaUtama, who ruled Temasek, a settlement on the Singapura Island during the early 14th century.
  • Buildings in Singapore cannot be higher than 280 metres. Currently, there are three buildings of that height – OUB Centre, UOB Plaza and Republic Plaza.