Japan

Japan

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Japan is an island country in East Asia, located in the northwest Pacific Ocean. It is bordered on the west by the Sea of Japan, and extends from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north toward the East China Sea and Taiwan in the south. See centuries-old shrines, explore pristine national parks, shop in chic urban centers or simply relax on an island beach resort. Across Japan, you will find cultural heritage of the highest international standards. See industry-leading architecture and design, and witness a highly seasonal aesthetic in everything from picture-perfect gardens to departmental stores and cuisine. Leave the towns and cities behind, and discover hot spring hamlets in the mountains, white sandy beaches and an array of adventure activities.

Interesting Facts:

  • Japan is mostly mountains. Its big-name stars are its densely populated cities, and it’s not a country you’d think of as a scarcely populated, mountain wilderness. However, around 70% of Japan is made up of forest and mountains that aren’t suitable for farming or living in. There are over 100 active volcanoes, and its tallest mountain is the famed Mount Fuji, with its elevation of 3,776 feet.
  • Tokyo is the most populated city in the world.
  • Japanese trains are some of the most punctual in the world.
  • Baseball is the most popular sport.
  • You can’t be fat. Sumo wrestlers of Japan are quite famous, but you would be surprised to know that there are hardly any obese people in the country, outside of sumo wrestling arena. Even though the Japanese have a well-balanced diet that is not the only reason for their low obesity rates. Reportedly, as per the 2008 Metabo Law, the government monitors the waistline of those who turn 40 years old to ensure that you stay healthy. In fact, Japanese citizens between the age of 40 and 74 are supposed to have their waistlines measured annually.
  • People are hired to push people inside trains. Around 57 per cent people in Tokyo use public transportation, thereby creating massive commuter struggles. If records are to be believed, most of the railways operate at more than 100 per cent overcapacity. To tackle this situation, the city even hires ‘transit pushers’ to push people inside the trains during rush hour.